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Capturing the wear and tear of an idealism thwarted by decades of diplomatic compromise. Image: © Adam Bartos

International Territory: Official Utopia and the United Nations, 1945-1995

Christopher Hitchens and Adam Bartos

“Bartos’ remarkable photographs of the U.N. Building in New York look cold and formal. But only at first. Actually they are full of feeling. This is the haunted house of idealist bureaucracy, filled with the ghosts of promises and suffused with nostalgia for the utopian rigor of high modernism. Nobody has ever put that in a photo before, and Hitchens’ essay expertly peoples the empty spaces of Bartos’ work.”— Robert Hughes

Publisher: Verso
Hardback: 168 pages
Illustrated

Reviews

I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala

Rigoberta Menchú

“Recounts the remarkable life of Rigoberta Menchú, a young Guatemalan peasant woman, through a series of interviews recording the details of everyday Indian life. Her story reflects the experiences common to many Indian communities in Latin America today. Menchú recounts suffering gross injustice and hardship in her earlier life: her brother, father and mother were murdered by the Guatemalan military. She learned Spanish and turned to catechist works as an expression of political revolt as well as religious commitment. Conveys both the religious and superstitious beliefs in her community and her personal response to feminist and social ideas.”

Publisher: Verso
Paperback: 251 pages

Ice Cube Sex

Dr. Jack Haberstroh

Written by a former “advertising practitioner and university educator” who not only dismisses the notion that media manipulators are busy airbrushing tits, asses and cocks into advertising images, but claims that subliminal advertising doesn’t work anyhow. So, if you get horny looking at ice cubes and Ritz crackers, that’s your problem. MG

Publisher: CrossRoads
Paperback: 181 pages
Illustrated

The Illusion of Animal Rights

Russ Carman

It’s all a class struggle! It’s the privileged, drug-using movie stars against the poor simple trappers engaged in their humble pursuits for the “physical and spiritual health it provides” but also for the extra income, which allows them “to buy Christmas presents” for their loved ones. While making a few valid points about the ecologically uninformed emotionalism of certain city-dwelling activists as well as their use of some suspiciously sensationalist photos, Carman strays magnificently off his tether in his description of the “religion” of film-industry activists, who depict animals as possessing “godlike qualities, the ability to communicate with man, to walk on air, never age, and survive great injury without blemish, [who] are born without sin and have life eternal.” His personal view is more down-to-earth: “After cleaning their dung, working hard in the hot fields to harvest their feed, and putting up with their often stubborn behavior, it was never hard to butcher them.” And Jesus told him to. RA

Publisher: Krause
Paperback: 160 pages

Immediatism

Hakim Bey

The latest tome from the insurrectionist theoretician. In this collection of essays, Bey expounds upon his ideas concerning radical social reorganization and the liberation of desire. AK

Publisher: AK
Paperback: 64 pages
Illustrated

The Imperial Temptation: The New World Order and America’s Purpose

Robert W. Tucker and David C. Hendrickson

With the fall of Communism, the U.S. was left in search of a new global agenda. According to the authors, the Bush administration betrayed the basic foundation of America in looking for a new role for the U.S. Using the Gulf War as the starting point of this new agenda, the authors expose the inconsistency of deliberately choosing military action when traditional diplomatic principles and other means were available—in their words, Bush succumbed to an “imperial temptation.” SC

Publisher: Council on Foreign Relations
Paperback: 228 pages

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Indictment: Inside the Oklahoma City Grand Jury—The Hoppy Heidelberg Story

Richard Cook

“Hoppy is the first federal grand juror in history to breech the cloak of Grand Jury secrecy and give us a glimpse into the inner workings of our judicial system. Risking his freedom, his family and his fortune, Hoppy speaks out in this video to tell us how the system really works—or doesn’t work. Hoppy reveals details about the manipulation and control of the Grand Jury by the federal prosecutors to achieve their goals, and points out that this kind of ‘justice’ can happen to any of us!”

Publisher: Equilibrium
Video

International Territory: Official Utopia and the United Nations, 1945-1995

Christopher Hitchens and Adam Bartos

“Bartos’ remarkable photographs of the U.N. Building in New York look cold and formal. But only at first. Actually they are full of feeling. This is the haunted house of idealist bureaucracy, filled with the ghosts of promises and suffused with nostalgia for the utopian rigor of high modernism. Nobody has ever put that in a photo before, and Hitchens’ essay expertly peoples the empty spaces of Bartos’ work.”—Robert Hughes

Publisher: Verso
Hardback: 168 pages
Illustrated

Irrational in Politics: Sexual Repression and Authoritarian Conditioning

Maurice Brinton

His classic argument that our political perceptions have been conditioned by the prevailing social and sexual patterns to reinforce the dominant ideology. AK

Publisher: See Sharp
Paperback: 52 pages

The Jonestown Massacre: The Transcript of Reverend Jim Jones’ Last Speech, Guyana 1978

James W. Clarke

“This booklet contains the transcript of the Reverend Jim Jones’ speech as his followers committed mass suicide in Jonestown, Guyana, in 1978. It is published in the interests of warning all of the dangers of charismatic preachers and of extreme fundamentalism.” “We didn’t commit suicide, we committed an act of revolutionary suicide protesting the conditions of an inhumane world… “—Rev. Jim Jones

Publisher: Temple
Pamphlet: 28 pages
Illustrated

The K Wave: Profiting From the Cyclical Boom and Bust in the Global Economy

David Knox Barker

In 1926, a Russian named Nikolai Kondratieff studied the 200-year history of Western-style global economics for his boss, Joseph Stalin, and compared it to the economic model of Communism. His data showed that in approximate 50-year cycles, the free-market West went into a slump, repositioned itself, then rebounded with renewed vigor. This boom-and-bust cycle became known as the K Wave, and Kondratieff used it to successfully predict the Great Depression. In comparison, Kondratieff showed that the planned communist/socialist system would become inefficient and stagnant. For all his effort, Kondratieff got Siberia. We got the K Wave theory. How will it carry the new world economy through the current “fall” season? And who will survive the “winter,” and prosper in the next century? China? The United States? Or—ironically—the new Russia? GR

Publisher: Irwin
Hardback: 320 pages